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Signs of Spring
16" x 20"
Oil on Canvas
$900
Artist's Comments
Inspired by a field I pass on my way to the Gallery each day, this piece reflects early spring in Vermont. After mud-season but before the full onset of summer, the strong red of scrub brush coming alive, the blush of red and purple still in the tree tops on distant hills, and the light green of new leaves; we awaken from a long cold winter to embrace a new burst of color. The colors change daily, almost hourly, this time of year. I trid to capture a moment that defines the transition between seasons when you know winter has been left behind.
Spring Greens Below Camel's Hump
10" x 16"
Oil
$450
Artist's Comments
Early spring greens below Camel's Hump in Vermont as seen from the Richmond exit of Route 89. Mountains still bare and new leaves on the lower elevations give the scene a nice contrast. The rich spring greens are as vibrant this time of year as any other time. This scene is seen by hundreds of people every day as then travel Route 89. The familiarity of it I find attractive. Seeing it in all seasons and weather led me to choose this time of year to capture it in a painting.
Reflections in a Winter Wood
15" x 30" x 1.5"
Oil on Canvas
$1125
Artist's Comments
Inspired by the work of Alan Kingwell, this winter wood painting tries to capture dawn as it reflects on a quiet stream. Several spots on my drive to work influence this piece, with their blanket of snow, and tree-lined stream-bed. I've always wanted to paint winter scenes like this, with soft light and cool shadows. I'm especially proud of the birch trees in this peice which I love to paint. Here they are neither understated nor over dramatized. They simply fit into the overall scene. That is the benefit of painting from imagination, you get to choose what to put in, what to leave out, what to enphasize.
Barns And Belties
16" x 20"
Oil on Canvas
$900
Artist's Comments
This farm in Waitsfield Vermont has fascinated me for the last couple of years. I have painted the front of it, and taken dozens of photos in all seasons. For this particular view I was driving a road about a half-mile away when I realized it provided me with a view of the back of these same barns. Using a telephoto lens I took shots with the "Beltie" cows (Belted Galloway cattle) just as the back of the barn. Often called "Oreo Cows" for their black ends and white middle, they add a nice graphic touch. This became my painting. For me it represents the history of Vermont dairy farming with its decaying barns still in functioning and providing views like this one.
The Road Home
16" x 20"
Oil on Canvas
$900
Artist's Comments
"The Road Home". Sometimes a place just feels right. While this is not literally the road to my home, when I discovered this spot along a dirt road in late summer one day it felt nostalgic to me. I would love to have this be my drive home at the end of each day, and so I adopted it with the title. For this painting the goal was to capture that feeling of heavy summer air late in the afternoon and moving through the shadows to the sunlit fields with a view to the barn beyond.
Autumn Marsh
16" x 20"
Oil on Canvas
SOLD
Artist's Comments
Another painting in a series of paintings inspired by my drive along route 15 between Essex and Jeffersonville Vermont. This particular spot had me stopping several times over the course of a few weeks waiting for the right light conditions. I enjoyed how the light reflected off the calm water on this particular day, and the play of autumn colors both in the marsh grasses and brush, and the distant hills.
Waking to a Winter Dawn
16" x 40" x 1.5"
Oil on Canvas
$1600
Artist's Comments
I am always fascinated by the early morning and late evening light on a winter landscape. I created this piece from imagination, using the chickadees as my focal point and the rising sun and early light to set the mood for this painting. This piece is reminiscent of the first painting I ever hung publicly, done in acrylics. I originally wanted to recreate a piece like that first one in acrylics for my YouTube audience, but ended up painting over the blocked-in painting with oil paints for this peice. It made the blending and diffuse light effects easier to render.
Cilly Hill Barn
18" x 24"
Oil on Canvas
$1200
Artist's Comments
Always on the lookout for a good scene to paint, I recently travelled up a road I once considered building a house on. I had never been this far up Cilly Hill in Underhill before and when I rounded the corner by this farm I was stunned at how beautiful it was. Most impressive were the trees nearer the road in front of the classic barn. I knew immediately I would paint this scene. Equally impressive but not from this vantage point, is the view of Mount Mansfield and surrounding peaks in the background. Which means I will be back to this place, likely several times, looking for the next angle to paint this beautiful spot. But for this painting I wanted the big trees out front to dominate. The faded red of the barn provides a nice foil for all the summer greens.
Early Spring Farm
16" x 20"
Oil on Panel
$900
Artist's Comments

Driving back and forth to my mentor's gallery all winter and spring, I would pass this spot. The farm sits on the side of a hill and catches the morning light. An iconic red barn with a single silo and hills behind. What draws me to the view though is the low-land fields which flood in spring and then are planted every summer. They create a nice shape that wraps around the farm itself. After stopping several times to consider how I wanted to paint this I settled on this view that accentuates that feeling of the farm nestled in between hill and fields.

I chose spring to paint this because I like the dark of the earth prior to the fields being plowed, still showing the stubble of last year's corn. The puddles that remain from a recent heavy rain reflect the blue of the sky and help eccentuate the early spring greens in the trees. At least, that's what I thought when I chose to paint it.

Too many of these farms disappear every year from the Vermont landscape. Painting them is fun, and the hope is enough people treasure these types of views to want to continue to support the local farmers who keep working these lands generation after generation.

Streaming Autumn Light
16" x 20"
Oil on Panel
SOLD
Artist's Comments
Bryce Hill in Cambridge Vermont has inspired more paintings than any place nearby, with the possible exception of Lower Pleasant Valley Road which sits just below Bryce Hill. After taking dozens of photos, in all seasons, and all conditions I finally settled on a late evening autumn photo as my main inspiration for this painting. Failing to find the perfect composition I combined a photo of the light hitting the hillsides, with one of a big maple tree along the road to arrive at this painting. I worked over the winter with Andrew Orr to improve my paintings and this painting demonstrates a lot of what I learned in that process.
Artists Choice Award
Northern Vermont Artists Association, Annual Juried Show. 2016
Autumn Dreams
24" x 48"
Acrylic on Canvas
NFS
Artist's Comments
My childhood and teen years were filled with romping in the woods, fishing, hiking and spending time outdoors. This painting, from imagination, was inspired by those memories and the memories of going to Maine with my dad. The woods, water, and foliage are the best things about the outdoors and I was seeking a peaceful painting of a place you could go to and relax, letting all the cares of the world slip away.


This painting was painted for my dad who passed away in November of 2015. May he rest in peace in the shade by the water at a place of his choosing.

Late Season Corn
16" x 20"
Acrylic on Canvas
$420
Artist's Comments
One of the things I find is that I like to paint familiar places that get overlooked. This scene is just after a turn from the main road between Essex and Richmond, heading towards Williston. The fields run along the Winooski River and late in the season the corn gets a reddish color on the top. This combination of corn, treeline, Camel's Hump in the distance and the first signs of autumn color attracted me to paint this scene. The blue in the shadows and the far mountains offset the orange-red in the foregrond for a nice color contrast.


This remains one of my favorite acrylic paintings.

Mountaintop Sunset
9" x 12"
Oil on Canvas
$300
Artist's Comments
Sometimes the best thing you can do is let go of expectations. I sometimes do small studies to practice different aspects of my painting. For this piece, I started off just practicing a sunset sky. When it came out pretty well, I decided to go ahead and finish with the foreground. Since my expectations were low, I felt more freedom to just go with how it was working out. This is from a couple of my own photos taken in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina.
Wee Three Chickadee
9" x 12"
Acrylic on Panel
SOLD
Artist's Comments
All winter where my "office" is there is a window that lets me watch the chickadees all day long. I hang a suet feeder in the bush by the window and watch these little guys. On really cold days they sometimes just sit and puff up their feathers to try and stay warm. I have photos of chickadees that look like fluffy tennis balls! So it shouldn't be a surprise that I have painted these birds again and again. They delight me. I painted a pair of paintings that are very similar, and used that opportunity to also film my process of painting these birds using acrylics.


You can watch the youtube video of my painting process here. There is a preview, and then the actual painting videos in three parts. Chickadee Painting Series

Three's A Crowd
9" x 12"
Acrylic on Panel
SOLD
Artist's Comments
This is the second of a pair of paintings of winter chickadees. You can find the description in the painting directly above.


You can watch the youtube video of my painting process here. There is a preview, and then the actual painting videos in three parts. Chickadee Painting Series

Impressionist Birch
16" x 20"
Oil on Canvas
$800
Artist's Comments
In my late teens and early twenties, when I was not painting, I fell in love with Impressionism. Most notably the work of Claude Monet. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston held an exhibit of Monet that included the haystack series and many others. So it was only natural when I began painting thirty years later that I would experiement with Impressionism. I tried to copy a couple of Monet paintings, and liked the loose style and use of color. Every artist develops a style, or different styles over time, based on many influences. By experimenting and trying different things we find out own unique voice.


This painting was about playing with the Impressionistic style of painting. I wanted to see what it was like to appy stokes of color to create a larger picture without trying to paint a specific subject. New to oil paints I was also experimenting with how the paint acted wet-into-wet. I still play with this style on occasion and find it fun and liberating when I find myself stuck or being too picky. I like how the light seems to play on the leaves and under the canopy in this painting.

Honorable Mention
Champlain Valley Fair. 2015
Barber Farm Study
9" x 12"
Oil on Panel
$300
Artist's Comments
In 2015 I painted the fields of Barber Farm for the first time. Typically for a pleinair event like this I like to go the week before and scout out the spot and take photos. Preferably I like to do a study the week before so I am familar with the subject on the day of the event. For this event I did this study the week prior to the event. The painting I did that day came out well, although I chose a slightly different composition, and it sold. However I liked this study a lot, and may even prefer it to the painting I did the day of the event. Its a fun painting on a overcast day but the colors in the fields really give it some pop.
Water Study
9" x 12"
Oil on Panel
NFS
Artist's Comments
Late in 2015 I began working with an amazing artist and teacher, Andrew Orr. This painting was one of the pieces we worked on together, so it will remain in my private collection. However it marks a turning point in my artist career as it shows the change in direction to a more realistic style. Andrew's ability to teach me how to paint trees and water will always be an influence in my painting going forward. It demonstrates a more patient approach. One that I now follow more closely with my studio work.
Autumn Serenity
16" x 16"
Acrylic on Canvas
$380
Artist's Comments
Waitsfield Vermont is one of my favorite areas to paint and take photos. Mountains and streams, barns, farms and fields, little towns and covered bridges. What's not to like? This painting is from a view right off the main road into Waitsfield. There are many views like this from all over the area, where you just have to find a place to pull over and you can paint practically from the side of the road. In this particular view it was the backlit tree that caught my eye. Capturing that feeling of a hot autumn afternoon was the goal.
Apple Blossoms & Chickadees
40" x 16"
Acrylic on Canvas
SOLD
Artist's Comments

Another all-time favorite. This painting was designed and painted as my first-ever entry to a juried gallery show. The Bryan Memorial Gallery had a call-to-artists for a show titled "Romancing The Garden". I was not yet working at the gallery, and so I immediately thought of apple blossoms as my main theme. This was also one of my first chickadee paintings, with only the winter birch with chickadees having preceded it. I carefully assessed where to place the three chickadees to create a pleasing composition and move the eye around the painting. From there I then planned how my branches had to be placed to support the overall composition, and finally the blossoms.

The background is built up in layers to give it depth and a feeling of backlit soft light. The whole painting tries to evoke spring in a soft woods filled with apple trees.

Painted on a gallery-wrapped canvas I then built a floater frame that allows the viewer to still see the painted egdes of the canvas. Both the black frame and the painting evoke an oriental feel for the end result.

Sap Run
40" x 30"
Acrylic on Canvas
$1200
Artist's Comments

One of the iconic images of Vermont is the spring Sap Run. While the snow is still deep in the woods but the air reaches above freezing during the day, the sap runs and is collected and boiled for Maple Syrup. I wanted to paint a piece that celebrated this ritual without it being too cliche. Having friends with a cabin in the woods who tap their trees for syrup each year, I was able to take a bunch of reference photos for this piece. While not closely based on those photos, the feeling and atmosphere, and some of the details, draw from spending a day collecting sap and taking photos. I like this painting also for the feeling of scale you get from the back hills and mountains. And while nowadays many maple syrup operations are large-scale with tubs criss-crossing the landscape collecting the sap, you can still find small family-run sugarbushes where the sap is collected in buckets by hand.


You can watch the youtube video of my painting process here. Painting Sap Run

Winter Birch & Chickadees
16" x 40"
Acrylic on Canvas
SOLD
Artist's Comments
This is the painting that started my path towards being a professional artist. It is the first piece I ever displayed in public, and the first piece I ever sold. Lucky enough to have an opportunity to create some art for a Inn in Waitsfield Vermont, I was given specific instructions to paint within certain parameters to fit the decor of this rustic Inn. Muted colors where the primary criteria. The painting was inspired, in part, by the work of Tim Gagnon and his misty forest series. I conceived of the piece as a winter forest painting and originally thought I would put a red male cardinal as the focal point. The chickadees were a response to the birds outside my window and they turned out to be the perfect choice. To this day this is the most watched video I have on youtube, even though that video is in time-lapse without any commentary.


You can watch the youtube video of my painting process here. This is a time-lapse video, and the first video of me painting that I ever produced. Winter Birch Forest